Tuesday, May 1, 2012

May Monster Madness Day 1 Ft. Frankenstein!!


Welcome to the first post of May Monster Madness! I want to thank Annie Walls for hosting this super cool blog hop! Thank you so much for checking out my blog. For MMM, I'll be discussing the famous Universal Monsters. Today's post is dedicated to Frankenstein. Good'ole Frankie! Out of all of the Universal Monsters, Frankenstein is by far my favorite monster. I think it's because of Boris Karloff's portrayal as Frankenstein. Instead of being the cynical, intelligent monster from the book, the Universal Studios version presents a childlike creature who doesn't know his own strength. Typical of me, falling for the lost souls and the misunderstood.

Frankenstein (full title: Frankenstein: A Modern Prometheus) is a novel by Mary Shelley, originally published in 1818, with a 1823 reprint without Shelley's involvement and a third edition in 1831, this time with significant edits from the author.


The novel tells the story of a scientist named Victor Frankenstein who unlocks the secrets to creating life, and uses this knowledge to create an artificial man, larger and stronger than most mortals, by means that he declines to describe in his narrative. While he is initially triumphant with his success, he is immediately disgusted by and fearful of his creation (who views him as its father), abandoning it and fleeing.

In his absence, the Creature has many bad run-ins with humanity and becomes fearful and cynical. He learns about humanity by watching a family cottage from afar, but is again driven off when he attempts to offer his friendship. Eventually, the Creature comes to resent his own creator, and decides to come home to seek vengeance against Frankenstein...

The subtitle, A Modern Prometheus, compares Victor Frankenstein to the Greek titan Prometheus, who brought the secret of fire from Mount Olympus to mortal men, reflecting on Frankenstein's spiritual would-be theft of the secret to creating life - but like Prometheus, Frankenstein also came to regret his transgression. Many would say that Frankenstein was the ultimate warning of Science Is Bad, though similar stories were common throughout the industrial revolution. More feminist interpretations point to the attempt to remove feminine influence from the act of creating life, exemplified when Frankenstein destroys the mate that he had agreed to make for the Creature, and the subsequent death of his own fiancee by the Creature's hand.





This novel has been adapted into a minor subgenre of movies and sequels.

The Bride of Frankenstein (1935)
Son of Frankenstein (1939)
The Ghost of Frankenstein (1942)
Frankenstein Meets the Wolf Man (1943)
House of Frankenstein (1944)
House of Dracula (1945)
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948).
The Munsters: The design of Herman Munster's makeup was heavily influenced by the Universal films.
Young Frankenstein parodied elements of the first three Universal movies.

5 comments:

  1. Great minds think alike, Jenny! ;D I feel so sorry for Frankenstein's monster. Like Edward Scissorhands, the story makes me feel sad. I really like Boris Karloff! He seemed such a nice man when I've seen clips of him being interviewed. And Elsa Lanchester just looks fab as the Bride!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I love the original novel. It is one of my absolute favorite books. I always found that none of the movies ever matched the book, but that is the case more often than not.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I must admit I'm more into the Frankenstein of the movies as opposed to the book. I'm a dummy. ha ha. ;)
    Great post! Looking forward to the rest of the week. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Give me the old school Frankenstein movies any day! Boris Karloff ruled, i watched all those old B&W monster movies as a kid, decades after they were made, and they still scared me.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Me and Frank had a lot of Frankenstein and Bride of Frankenstein things incorporated into our wedding.. including our cake topper. I have the Bride as a pin up girl tattoo'd on my arm too :)

    ReplyDelete

I LOVE comments and I appreciate them. I will always comment you back or at least I'll try :D I want to thank everyone who reads and comments my blog. Thank you!! - Jenny Krueger *Peace, Love and Necrophilia*